Aruba pediatrician: 80% of sexual child abuse cases in Aruba incest related

Aruba pediatrician: 80% of sexual child abuse cases in Aruba incest related

Posted on 12/5/2017 6:03 pm AST | Updated on 12/5/2017 6:04 pm AST

ORANJESTAD – Eighty percent of sexual abuse cases in Aruba are related to incest, according to Aruba pediatrician Louise Rafael Croes during the NoticiaCla LIVE Facebook show. According to Rafael, of every 10 confirmed sexual abuse case, 8 were cases involving a father, uncle or other close relative, which makes it an incest case. Rafael calls this a very alarming situation. Worst is that she isn’t even shocked, as this is almost a regular occurrence.  

SHOCK

While Rafael was shocked to hear about the recent abuse and murder case, she wasn’t shocked that ‘another case’ took place. She reminded all that 2 years ago an 11 toddler died after being beaten by her father. And then there is the case where 4 years ago a 3-year-old child died after being beaten severely by her father. “So its not the first nor the last one” Rafael stated. “Thing is”, Rafael continued, “ that more people are reporting this now compared to the past”. .

REGISTRATION

An Aruba parliament member recently stated that 32 cases of child abuses were reported in Aruba in just one week. Rafael confirmed the numbers during the show. “In 2016 we reported 175 cases of child abuse, which translates into 1 case every 2 days”. The numbers keep mounting dramatically. Rafael started registering cases in 2012, and has since seen a steady increase in numbers, sadly enough. Bottom-line, is that it seems there is a child abuse case almost daily.

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